Noses and Ears – The Darker side of Japan

Nowadays, Japan is seen as a very peaceful place. After World War II, Japan’s military presence has waned, and they are focused more on creating friendships over war. But, this was not always the case. Most if you will know about the Samurai, and the countries militaristic past, but there are darker sides to this countries war stories than most know.

From 1592-1598, Japan attempted to invade and control all of East Asia. During this time, a lot of effort was put into the invasion of Korea, led by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. It had long been the tradition to collect the severed heads of those you felled in battles and take them home as war trophies. But, due to the distance, and the sheer number of killings that occurred at this time, many soldiers collected ears and noses instead.


These souvenirs of battle were then stored in brine and transported back to Japan to be placed in Mimizuka – literally; Mound of Ears. This mound still stands today, but serves as a memorial of the Korean soldiers killed, rather than a show of power. What will probably surprise you the most though, is the location of this hill of mutilation – right in the suburbs of Kyoto. In fact, its right next to a children’s play park.


Mimizuka is located just to the west of the Toyokuni Shrine in Higashiyama. The closest station is Shichijo on the Keihan line for those of you who want to visit.

Advertisements

One thought on “Noses and Ears – The Darker side of Japan

  1. takemetheretraveller says:

    So interesting! I love Japan everything about the people, the culture & the history is so intriguing!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s